FOREVER SKY (2013)

for trumpet sextet

FOREVER SKY is a four-minute work for Bb OR C Trumpet ensemble that depicts the vastness and glory of outer space. The title is derived from a poem (below) entitled Outer Space, written by Pulitzer Prize winner, William Matthews. FOREVER SKY has several prominent themes (both rhythmic and melodic) that permeate the work. This piece also deals somewhat extensively with bitonality. These ideas comprise to make an interesting new addition to the trumpet ensemble repertoire.

 

Outer Space by William Matthews

“If you could turn the moon on a lathe, you would because you are curious.

And that would explain why the moon slivers, but explain it stupidly

by not taking care to ask how the moon rounds. And so we go, stupid ideas

for feet. The better to wander with, retort the feet, and what can you say,

you who shaved those taut spirals from the moon, kinks of tightening light

that fell away from your attention to your work growing smaller the better you did it?

Threads on a screw, the worm of a corkscrew, the circular staircase to sleep....

Soon the moon is gone as far as it can go and still come back. Soon there'll be no room

for you: the moon will be all stomach, like a melon. The nest you've been meaning

to leave is inside, aslosh with seeds. Around the outside you curl like the sky that goes away forever.”

 

Commissioned by William Luckett & the University of Alabama Trumpet Ensemble.

 

AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE THROUGH TRIPLO PRESS!

 

*RECORDING PERFORMED & PRODUCED BY JIM OLCOTT.

ITG Journal, Jaunary 2015, page 101:

 

"...an exciting piece for the intermediate/advanced undergraduate trumpet ensemble, and directors will appreciate the challenges presented. Developing consistency of intonation, balance, and color between C trumpets and flugelhorns will challenge students’ abilities to listen and adjust within the ensemble (as will) frequent use of double tonguing, syncopation, duple/triple rhythmic ostinati, extremities of range and large intervallic leaps. The piece can effectively be used to open or close a recital. Beautiful melodic lines, interesting group textures, and a wide rhythmic vocabulary await those who have time to prepare this excellent piece to performance quality."

 

- Jesse Cook, Northeastern State University, Tahequah, OK